Corporate Photo Shoot: Venie Brinson Realtor in Clearwater, Florida



I have only two more weeks here in the U.S. And I’m taking the opportunity to travel and do some of the jobs I’ve been meaning to get to for a while. The below shots are for a realty company in Clearwater, Florida. Venie Brinson Realtor is actually the oldest continually run Realtor in Clearwater, so it was pretty great that I got the chance to shoot one of the owners and her favorite Realtor.

My intention was to give them both a welcoming demeanor and show that they are two people you can trust and do business with. I particularly like the shot in the kitchen with Lou. The Red mixer matched Lou’s tie.

All shots are with my Canon 5D Mark II and 580 EX II Strobe shot through an umbrella.

Venie Brinson Realty - Clearwater, Florida

Venie Brinson Realtor - Clearwater, Florida

Venie Brinson Realty - Clearwater, Florida

Venie Brinson Realtor - Clearwater, Florida

Venie Brinson Realty - Clearwater, Florida

Venie Brinson Realtor - Clearwater, Florida

Restaurant Photography: A Brief How-To-Guide



We’ve all been there. Sitting in a dark, corner table of a fantastic restaurant, wishing that we had more light, so we didn’t have to use that terrible built-in flash. Perhaps the meal was one of the best we’ve ever eaten and the one thing that would have made it better is gorgeous photos to post to our website, Facebook page, or blog. When we get home the results are less than spectacular. Usually, the flash creates hot-spots on anything reflective on the table. Including, stemware, cutlery and crockery. The grain from the high ISO used also is a very annoying factor in low-light, restaurant photography. There are some easy solutions to this.

How to get great photos in any restaurant:

1. Diffused sunlight – The quickest and easiest way to get great photos is to shoot with available, indirect sunlight. This could be choosing a table outside, under an umbrella, where the sunlight would be diffused by the umbrella. This method is by far the best for achieving excellent photos.

Diffussed Sunlight

Diffussed Sunlight - The George and Dragon in Speldhurst

2. Get a table by the window – If there are no outdoor tables available, or it’s too cold, rainy, etc. there are other methods. One trick is to ask the reservations desk if you can have a table by the window when booking. If they say no, than ask when the next available seating is when a window is available. Don’t be embarrassed to push it and insist. They are there to serve you.

Table by the Window

Table by the Window-The RIver Cafe in Hammersmith

3. Use fast lenses – Outdoor and window tables work during the daylight, but what about dining in the evening, when the sun is down and there’s nothing but the available light in the restaurant? This is where it gets tricky. For those with point-and-shoot cameras you don’t have many options. To achieve really brilliant results indoors, using dim light, you need to get yourself a DSLR (digital single lens reflex) camera, which has the ability to swap lenses. That is, one that doesn’t just have a single fixed lens. My favorite beginner camera is the Nikon D40. But any of the newer Canons, Nikons, etc. will work. I don’t use Nikon anymore, but I’ve found that you can get a really good deal on the D40 on eBay, or Amazon. The lens is really what matters. You want a fast lens. Meaning, a lens which lets in a lot of light. One that has a large aperture, (amount of light let in reflects aperture size) f1.8, or f2.8 lets in lots of light and are called large apertures, or fast lenses. Despite their small numbers. Anything smaller (f4.0 and above) and you’re going to have trouble. Unless you have IS (image stabilization) on your lens.

4. Use image preview – I have found that having image preview on my camera works very well for restaurant photography. This is built-in to almost all point-and-shot cameras, but is still very limited on DSLRs. The reason I find it so helpful is because I don’t have to hold the camera up to my face to shoot. This can be very distracting when taking photos in nice restaurants especially. With image preview, you look at the LCD screen on the back of the camera and focus your photograph without having to bring the camera above your food.

5. Shoot at table level, not eye level – When shooting food you want to always strive to photograph at an angle which is 10-40 degrees from the table. Meaning, don’t take food shots at eye level. We humans always see our food at eye level and it’s more intriguing when we see it at the actual level the food is at. About 10 degrees above the plate is perfect.

6. Get in close – I see way too many food bloggers shooting with wide-angle lenses and as a result the photographs aren’t attractive. There is way too much going on in the foreground and background, when really, all we want to see is the food. So unless you want to highlight some specific areas of the table, or the restaurant, get in close.

Get in Close

Get in Close - The Bibury Court Hotel in Bibury

7. Don’t use your built-in flash – Built-in flash tends to flatten an image and make it dull. Try to utilize one of the methods above first and if all else fails, flip that flash, but only in an emergency.

And finally, don’t discount your photo editing software. Even bland, flat images can be saved using the curves function.

Today you can find top quality, used equipment for a fraction of the price new. Get yourself a good DSLR and 50mm f1.8 lens and your restaurant and food photography will really start to shine.

Food Photography Shoot: French Macaroons



I recently had a client email me who wanted some photos for her and her husbands new business, making and selling French Macaroons. I love taking photos of macaroons and in preparation I decided to take some shots this morning. Whole Foods in Tampa had four kinds of macaroons, so I bought one of each. The results of the shoot are below. You can see why I love shooting them so much. On the surface they are very plain, but when you add a little color and decoration they really shine.

I used my Canon 5D Mark II with 24-105mm f4 lens and Canon 580 EX II flash, shot through a diffuser and bounced off of a large reflector.

French Macaroons

French Macaroons

French Macaroons

French Macaroons

French Macaroons

French Macaroons

Corporate Photo Shoot: Smart Way Reading and Spelling



Sometimes I get to photograph a company that is changing this planet for the better. Smart Way Reading and Spelling is just such a company. What could be better than to have a business where you teach kids how to read and write? When I got the call to photograph some students using the program I was thrilled. I have never been a person that just wanted to go out and make money, regardless of the product I’m pushing. That’s one of the reasons I opted to reduce my time as a marketing consultant, and increase my time as a photographer. I couldn’t continue to market companies I didn’t believe in. With Smart Way Reading and Spelling I get the pleasure of ensuring that the company has excellent photos for their marketing and promotional purposes, as well as satisfying my need to contribute to this society.

Smart Way Reading and Spelling

Smart Way Reading and Spelling

Smart Way Reading and Spelling

Smart Way Reading and Spelling

Smart Way Reading and Spelling

Smart Way Reading and Spelling

Smart Way Reading and Spelling

Smart Way Reading and Spelling

Smart Way Reading and Spelling

Smart Way Reading and Spelling

The World’s Biggest Nikon Fan? Maybe.



You think you like Nikon? Meet my uncle, Scott. Since switching from Canon to Nikon he has been a one man Nikon-purchasing machine. If it’s got Nikon printed on it, he’s got it. Well, almost. I know a lot of photographers that are loyal to their camera systems, but I’ve never known anyone to be so loyal. It’s really great to see.

Hat? – CHECK!

Camera and multiple lenses? – OF COURSE!

Sweatshirt? – GOT IT!

Camera bag? – YUP!

Lens cleaning clothes? – UH HUH!

Patches? – YES, SIR!

Pins? – GOT THAT RIGHT!

Camera armor? NO QUESTION!

Member of the Nikon Fan Page on Facebook? – ABSOLUTELY!

You can check out my uncle’s shots by visiting his Flickr page and blog.

Nikon Guy

Nikon Guy

Nikon's Biggest Fan

Nikon's Biggest Fan

 

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